After Gabriel’s Rebellion had Been Suppressed by Rain and Two Informants Gabriel escaped down the Chickahominy River but on September 23, 1800, he was arrested and imprisoned at the newly built Penitentiary.

  • December 3, 1797 – Richmond authorities charge Jacob Valentine, a white man, with “committing and encouraging an Insurrection among the Slaves of the City of Richmond.”
  • December 11, 1797 – Charged with “committing and encouraging an Insurrection among the Slaves of the City of Richmond,” Jacob Valentine, a white man, appears in a Richmond court but is unable to post a bond.
  • Late Spring 1800 – Sam Byrd Jr., an enslaved man owned by Jane Clarke of Henrico, proposes an uprising and begins recruiting among other enslaved men residing in the neighborhood of the Brook. The recruiting lasts through the summer.
  • June 1800 – James Thomson Callender, a critic of the Adams administration, is tried for sedition. The U.S. Army regiment stationed near Richmond is discharged by June 14.
  • August 9, 1800 – Rumors of a slave plot—what eventually will be called Gabriel’s Conspiracy—surface in Petersburg.
  • August 10, 1800 – On or about this day, a group of enslaved men led by Gabriel and Jack Bowler set the date for their planned uprising. They will meet on the night of August 30 and attack Richmond.
  • August 30, 1800 – In a letter to James Monroe, Mosby Sheppard warns the governor of a planned insurrection that comes to be known as Gabriel’s Conspiracy.
  • August 30, 1800 – A planned slave revolt led by a blacksmith named Gabriel (owned by Thomas Prosser, of Henrico County) is thwarted when a huge storm delays the meeting of the conspirators and a few nervous slaves reveal the plot to their masters.
  • August 31, 1800 – Patrols in Henrico County begin capturing enslaved men who are suspected with involvement in Gabriel’s Conspiracy. The plot’s leaders, Gabriel and Jack Bowler, disappear.
  • September 2, 1800 – Militia units in Richmond, Henrico, and Chesterfield mobilize upon news of a planned slave uprising, or what comes to be known as Gabriel’s Conspiracy. Guards are sent to the state arsenal at Point of Fork and patrols are ordered out across the state.
  • September 11, 1800 – The trials of enslaved men suspected of participating in Gabriel’s Conspiracy begin in Henrico County.
  • September 12, 1800 – Five enslaved men connected to Gabriel’s Conspiracy are executed in Richmond: Will, John, Isaac, Michael, and Ned.
  • September 15, 1800 – Five enslaved men connected to Gabriel’s Conspiracy are executed in Richmond: Solomon, Billy, Martin, Charles, and Frank.
  • September 15, 1800 – In a letter to Thomas Jefferson, Governor James Monroe seeks advice on how best to punish those slaves arrested in connection with Gabriel’s Conspiracy.
  • September 18, 1800 – Five enslaved men connected to Gabriel’s Conspiracy are executed in Richmond: Sawney, Peter, Jupiter, Sam, and Isham. Ben Woolfolk is pardoned for providing evidence.
  • September 20, 1800 – In a letter to Governor James Monroe, Thomas Jefferson offers his advice on how best to punish those slaves arrested in connection with Gabriel’s Conspiracy.
  • September 23, 1800 – Gabriel, an enslaved man owned by Thomas H. Prosser, is captured in Norfolk aboard a schooner. He may have had the captain’s assistance, but an enslaved crewman turns him in for conspiring to lead a slave insurrection.
  • October 1, 1800 – By this date the militia is mustered in Nansemond and Suffolk for about ten days in order to provide security in the wake of Gabriel’s Conspiracy.
  • October 2, 1800 – Jacob, an enslaved man belonging to Thomas Woodfin and convicted in connection with Gabriel’s Conspiracy, is pardoned.
  • October 3, 1800 – The Council of State rejects Governor James Monroe’s proposal to reprieve enslaved men condemned in connection with Gabriel’s Conspiracy until the next meeting of the General Assembly. Five slaves are pardoned: Abraham, Dick, Peter, and two men named Billy.
  • October 6, 1800 – Gabriel, an enslaved man owned by Thomas H. Prosser, is tried and convicted of conspiring to lead a slave insurrection.
  • October 8, 1800 – Three enslaved men connected to Gabriel’s Conspiracy are pardoned: Solomon, Dick, and Randolph.
  • October 9, 1800 – Jack Bowler, alias Jack Ditcher, an enslaved man owned by the estate of the late William Bowler, surrenders to authorities, who suspect him of conspiring to lead a slave insurrection.
  • October 10, 1800 – Ten enslaved men connected to Gabriel’s Conspiracy are executed in and about Richmond: Gabriel, Sam Byrd Jr., Isaac, Laddis, George, Gilbert, Tom, Michael, William, and Sam Graham.
  • October 24, 1800 – Peter, an enslaved man owned by the estate of W. P. Claiborne, is executed in Dinwiddie County for conspiracy, possibly in connection with Gabriel’s plot.
  • October 29, 1800 – Jack Bowler, alias Jack Ditcher, an enslaved man owned by the estate of the late William Bowler, is tried and convicted of conspiring to lead a slave insurrection.
  • November 8, 1800 – James, an enslaved man owned by Elisha Price, and Scipio, an enslaved man owned by Paul Thilman, both of whom have been convicted for their involvement in Gabriel’s Conspiracy, are pardoned.
  • December 9, 1800 – Ned, an enslaved man owned by William Young and convicted for his involvement in Gabriel’s Conspiracy, is pardoned.
  • September 17, 1831 – In “Gabriel’s Defeat,” the editors of The Liberator reprint a romanticized account of Gabriel’s Conspiracy (1800) that first appeared in the Albany Evening Journal. The context of its publication is the more recent, more successful uprising led by Nat Turner in Southampton County earlier in the year.
  • October 21, 1831 – In “Gabriel’s Defeat,” the editors of the Richmond Enquirer seek to correct the facts in an article of the same title published in the Albany Evening Journal. The subject is Gabriel’s Conspiracy, an attempted slave uprising in 1800.
  • September 1862 – In the Atlantic Monthly, Thomas Wentworth Higginson publishes “Gabriel’s Defeat,” a history of the failed 1800 slave uprising.

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Haki Kweli Shakur 9-23-51ADM August Third Colletive NAPLA -New Afrikan Independence Movement – Provisional Government of The Republic of New Afrika – GJU – The Jericho Movement – MXGM

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